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Posted: 1 Oct 2007

Wallace Terry
BOOK REVIEW: Missing Pages by Janice Terry & Zalin Grant. Reviewed by Carlos Campbell

The author’s voice of Missing Pages has an energy powered by truth which resonates beyond race. Missing Pages enhances the legacy of Wallace Terry, the author of the best selling Bloods (circa 1985) who distinguished himself as a journalist with Time Magazine, The Washington Post and Parade Magazine. The book was skillfully completed by Janice Terry, the author’s widow and Zalin Grant, a fellow combat journalist with whom he served in Vietnam.

Missing Pages rips the mask off of the Fourth Estate which historically abandoned its duty to the people by printing with a discernible bias. As it were, black journalist were either denied positions with the mainstream press or relegated to black on black assignments. During and subsequent to the heyday of the Civil Rights movement things began to change, but on a very small scale.



While attempts were made to restrict assignments of black journalists, their courage, perseverance and genius trumped racism and indifference.

Missing Pages is long overdue. It provides a unique insight into America from those who, to cite the biblical injunction of Isaiah 48:10 were “Not molded in silver but in the furnace of affliction.”

The challenge of writing about race requires courage, candor, competence, civility and compassion. One has to deal with injustice, humiliation and other wrongs which often lurk in the subconscious of the objectified. Wallace Terry sets the standard for excellence in his interviews with names familiar to many, Carl Rowan, Max Robinson, Bernard Shaw, Carole Simpson, Chuck Stone, Ed Bradley and others.

Those interviewed such as Chuck Stone, who said the reason there were not more black columnists with white newspapers, is because white America feared black authority. Missing pages also contains the experience of good Samaritans, such as Walter Cronkite, who stopped to help somebody.

Missing Pages is inspirational because is reveals how individuals asserted themselves through persistence, courage, dedication and professional excellence.

Carlos Cardozo Campbell
Reston, VA
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Posted: 14 May 2009
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Posted: 14 May 2009
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Posted: 9 Oct 2008
Carlos Campbell Carlos Cardozo Campbell reviews The Express a film scheduled for release October 10,2008. Based on an inspirational true story, The Express follows the life of college football hero Ernie Davis (Rob Brown), the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy. Following his draft by the NFL, tragedy struck the inspirational life of college football hero Ernie Davis (Rob Brown), the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy. Following his draft by the NFL, tragedy struck the star athlete and he was never able to take the professional field. But his tale would forever change the face of professional sports. A Film Review by Carlos Cardozo Campbell
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Posted: 27 Sep 2008
Carlos Campbell THE EXPRESS: The Life Story of Ernie Davis
A Film Reviewby Carlos Cardozo Campbell
© Copyright 2008 by Carlos Cardozo Campbell, All Rights Reserved
September 16, 2008
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Posted: 10 Jul 2008
Carlos Campbell

Senator McCain has clearly demonstrated his physical and psychological courage. There are, however, other types of courage such as intellectual, ethical, and political. Focusing on such types of courage is where attention must be paid in assessing a candidate’s fitness for president.

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Posted: 9 Jul 2008
Carlos Campbell

Editor's note: The author, Carlos Cardoza Campbell was a Naval Aviator and Air Intelligence Officer. During the period 1959-1968, he acquired over 1000 hours in Navy Patrol Squadrons and achieved the rank of Lieutenant Commander. He also attained his private pilot's license in single engine land based aircraft.

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Posted: 9 Jun 2008
Carlos Campbell China’s Olympic Triumph: Coming of Age in Beijing   -- Read More >
Posted: 30 Apr 2008
Carlos Campbell Two Wrongs do not equal wRight! Carlos Campbell writes "Recently retired from Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, where he was Senior Pastor for 36 years, Reverend Jeremiah Wright skyrocketed to fame because of his incendiary rhetoric and because a member of his congregation, Senator Barack Obama, is running for president of the United States. The timing of Reverend Wright to perform on the national stage, in the midst of a close presidential primary campaign is self-serving and wrong."   -- Read More >
Posted: 21 Apr 2008
Carlos Campbell LEADERSHIP QUEST: New Politics – Old Practices   -- Read More >
Posted: 27 Jan 2008
Carlos Campbell Carlos Cardozo Campbell's tour de force alerts us to history unfolding with the phenomenon of Barack Obama. Mr. Campbell's very personal account provides unique insight into an American success story. He also touches upon the unedifying spectacle of ex-President as political pit bull and hatchet man. This essay is, however, about Ombama the Senator, the Presidntial Candidate and the man.

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Posted: 17 Dec 2007
Carlos Campbell Carlos Campbell provides a heart-felt Appreciation of Sean Taylor. "On Tuesday November 27, 2007, tears flooded my face as I watched a local television show where countless strangers, teammates, coaches, sport celebrities and announcers, paid tribute to Sean Taylor, the Washington Redskins All-Pro free safety who had been gunned down a day earlier." He writes further,"Sean Taylor joins another All-Star athlete who wore number 21, Roberto Clemente. Almost thirty-five years ago this month, Clemente, a perennial National Baseball League All-Star since his selection in 1961, was killed in an aircraft accident.... Both Clemente and Taylor give honor to number 21."

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Posted: 14 Nov 2007
Carlos Campbell Veteran Carlos Campbell reminds why November 11 must be held special. "On this Veterans Day, I thank God almighty, that I was privileged to serve as a Naval Officer in aircraft squadrons which consisted of some of the finest officers and men that I ever associated with in my life. For those who have served and survived, we must not forget our brothers and sisters who rest in peace or those who live with the scars of combat both physically and mentally."   -- Read More >
Posted: 1 Oct 2007
Carlos Campbell BOOK REVIEW: Missing Pages has an energy powered by truth which resonates beyond race. This book enhances the legacy of Wallace Terry, the author of the best selling Bloods (circa 1985) who distinguished himself as a journalist with Time magazine, The Washington Post and Parade Magazine. Missing Pages rips the mask off of the Fourth Estate which historically abandoned its duty to the people by printing with a discernible bias.   -- Read More >
Posted: 16 Sep 2007
Carlos Campbell New Orleans as Emblematic of the American Ghetto "The American Ghetto is an international disgrace" writes Carlos Campbell, former US Assistant Secretary of Commerce. "The Ninth Ward in New Orleans is a ghetto. The post Katrina New Orleans is a model of ineptitude, complacency, chaos and calamity. America has failed it’s own. The citizens of New Orleans are rightly suspicious of their leadership because historically it has been limited to the fair skin Creole types. When Mayor Ray Nagin called for New Orleans to be rebuilt as a 'Chocolate City,' he was projecting empathy for the people who have historically received a raw deal."   -- Read More >
Posted: 2 Sep 2007
Carlos Campbell Maxwell Lemuel Roach (January 10, 1924 – August 16, 2007) was a bebop/hard bop percussionist, drummer, and composer. He worked with many of the greatest jazz musicians, including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Sonny Rollins and Clifford Brown. Roach also led his own groups, and made numerous musical statements relating to the civil rights movement of African-Americans. He is generally considered to be one of the most important drummers in history.(January 10, 1924 – August 16, 2007) was a bebop/hard bop percussionist, drummer, and composer. He worked with many of the greatest jazz musicians, including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Sonny Rollins and Clifford Brown. Roach also led his own groups, and made numerous musical statements relating to the civil rights movement of African-Americans. He is generally considered to be one of the most important drummers in history. Wikipedia   -- Read More >
Posted: 29 Mar 2007
Carlos Campbell

On Tuesday February 28, 2006, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill (400-0) to award the Tuskegee Airman the Congressional Gold Medal.On March 29 2007, surviving members of the renowned Afro-American flying team were honored in the Capitol Rotunda for their historic accomplishments.

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Posted: 20 Apr 2006
Carlos Campbell Former US Assistant Secretary of Commerce and Continentaldivide.us Staff Writer Carlos Campbell argues for stronger border security counter-balanced with humanitarian compassion. "That we are a nation of immigrants enriches us; that we harbor some 12 million illegal immigrants challenges both our heritage and future." However, "Building a wall between the southern border of the United States and Mexico is not an option."   -- Read More >
Posted: 17 Mar 2006
Carlos Campbell

Carlos C. Campbell, former Lieutenant Commander, Naval Aviator and Air Intelligence Officer, reflects upon a seminal event in US military and social history, The Tuskeegee Triumph. On Tuesday February 28, 2006, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill (400-0) to award the Tuskegee Airman the Congressional Gold Medal. This is recognition long overdue to the intrepid aviators who fought for respect and dignity on the ground as much as they fought to set the standard for combat aviation during World War Two. Early on, critics questioned whether or not "Negroes" could fly at all much less than in combat. The NAACP, Urban League, Civil Rights leaders such as A. Phillip Randolph, and the First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt worked arduously to champion the cause of black aviators.

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Posted: 21 Sep 2005
Carlos Campbell The Gulf Cost hung tough enduring the double onslaught of Rita and Katrina, but carnage will be with us as far as the eye can see. Former Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic Development Carlos Campbell reflects upon how the first catastrophe,Katrina, now compounded, impacts upon the Crescent City. She was a killer hurricane with a diameter over 400 miles and winds up to 140 miles per hour. Its force varied between that of a category four and five hurricane. In its wake lay hundreds of dead people. The costs to rebuild are estimated between fifty and one hundred billion dollars. Katrina was the greatest natural disaster in the United States in the last century.   -- Read More >
Posted: 11 Mar 2005
Carlos Campbell We have the very good fortune of featuring an exclusive interview with Jim Brown, arguably the greatest running back in the history of football by Features Editor Carlos C. Campbell. But this isn't about sports or entertainment. Mr. Brown has become a significant force in addressing the problems and challenges of former and current gang members, convicts, ex-convicts and high school students vulnerable to gang influence and recruitment   -- Read More >
Posted: 1 Jan 2005
Carlos Campbell From the optimistic oratory of [Barack] Oboma at the Democratic National Convention, to the mean spirited message of [Zell] Miller, during the Republican National Convention, America 's viewing audience witnessed the extremes between the apogee and perigee of political hyperbole.   -- Read More >
Posted: 1 Jan 2005
Carlos Campbell I have met several “survivors,” but none like William Samelson whom I have known for three decades. He is one of the most amazing, resilient, courageous and compassionate men I have known. His infectious smile and enviable sense of humor is in sharp contrast to the numbers on his arm and the photo of his dark recessed eyes and skeletal frame, taken when he was liberated.   -- Read More >
Posted: 1 Jan 2005
Carlos Campbell Lights, Camera, Action! Another performance in the theater of the absurd. Political casting directors normally respect the credo of the late Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Tip O’Neil who said: “All politics is local.” Many of us know that Chicago politics are different. This is the city where career politicians from everywhere chose to be buried so they can remain politically active.   -- Read More >
Posted: 1 Jan 2005
Carlos Campbell Fred Campbell is not a household name. His story is remarkable. His father was killed on an explosion on the Panama Canal somewhere around 1910. Fred lived in Culebra with his mother and later his stepfather King Lawrence. When I visited Panama in 1995, Culebra did not exist. I found out that it had been a squatter’s camp for constructions workers on the canal. Fred Campbell left Panama and went to Havana, Cuba where he drove a taxi.   -- Read More >